Academic and Student Well-being Recovery Plan

2021-2023

June 2021 UPDATE

Lake Chelan School District

Academic and Student Well-being Recovery Plan Overview:  English / Spanish

Table of Contents

Plan Overview and Purpose -Click here

Health and Safety of Students, Staff and Families -Click here

Diagnostic Assessments and Findings -Click here

Academic Recovery and Acceleration -Click here

Student Social, Emotional, and Mental Well-being -Click here

Monitoring Student Progress -Click here

Student and Family Voice -Click here

Community Partnerships -Click here

 

Plan Overview & Purpose

Our Mission and Vision

Our Vision

Educational Excellence for All Students 

 

Mission Statement  

In partnership with the parents and the community, the Lake Chelan School District will provide an educational environment in which all students will:

  • maximize academic potential, 
  • demonstrate respect for individual differences, 
  • prepare themselves for future employment, 
  • have opportunities for life-enriching activities, 
  • become successful life-long learners, and 
  • active participants in stewardship of their community.

 

Note from the Superintendent

There is no more opportune or critical time to rethink school in our community.  As a result of the pandemic, inequities in our educational system have become even more apparent.  Therefore, the Lake Chelan School District is committed to fundamentally shifting our systems, programs and practices to better serve all students and families.  

 

Central to this work will be realizing a new vision for re-designing our schools.  Systemic re-design must occur with an intentional focus on creating a relationship-based culture as our foundation.  Within this culture are key three pillars:

  1. Whole Learner Focused: To address the needs of the whole learner, the entire system must attend to the social, emotional, cognitive, mental health and trauma based needs of ALL learners.  Our schools must be a safe haven, where all students are included, respected and feel a sense of belonging.
  2. No Learner Marginalized: When we say “ALL Learners” we mean ALL – especially our students with disabilities, English Language learners, latinx learners and our students furthest from social justice. Our system must embrace “equity for all” where all children, families and staff are embraced and valued equally.
  3. Future Driven:   It’s time to fully let go of the practices and processes that were born in the 20th century industrial model of education.  No longer can we teach outdated skills that prepare students for our past and their futures. A school culture that is future-driven will allow us to look forward and anticipate a new career landscape.  These insights into the future must inform the skills we teach, the technologies we use to teach and the career pathways we introduce to our students.

The  Lake Chelan school district is in the process of working with our community to establish a new vision that will reshape our schools for the future. A future that provides  ALL students with the skills and knowledge to reach their full potential.

 

Plan Required in Federal and State Law

FEDERAL LAW

Federal Law American Rescue Plan Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief (ARP ESSER) Fund under the American Rescue Plan (ARP) Act of 2021, Public Law 117-2.

 

In order for LEAs to access these funds, they must submit a plan according to the U.S. Department of Education Fact Sheet “American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief Fund (ARP ESSER).” In the Fact Sheet, the Department of Education requires each LEA to develop an “LEA Safe Return to In-Person Instruction Plan.”

 

WASHINGTON STATE LAW

LEA Academic and Student Well-being Recovery Plan (House Bill 1368; Sec. 12 [2021]).

LEAs must address the following elements in their Academic and Student Well-being Recovery Plan, using the OSPI-provided template:

  1. Identification of specific diagnostic assessments tools by grade level; identification of student learning and well-being gaps; and focus of additional time, supports, and/or extracurricular activities for students most impacted.
  2. Inclusion of the following student groups in all data included in the Plan: American Indian/Alaskan Native; Asian; Black/African American; Hispanic/Latino of any race(s); Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander; Two or More Races; White; English Learner; Students Experiencing Poverty; Students with Disabilities; Students Experiencing Homelessness; and Students in Foster Care.
  3. Students’ learning recovery (including addressing the needs of the student groups identified above), specifically identifying and correcting disproportional impact resulting from the school building closures and extended time in remote learning due to the COVID19 pandemic.
  4. Provision of additional instruction, student well-being support, and extracurricular opportunities based on an assessment of student needs (academic and well-being).
  5. Additional elements identified by OSPI that are based on evidence of positive learning and well-being outcomes (e.g., balanced calendar, additional school days, additional instruction time, or any combination of these elements). While the examples provided are recommended, the following are required:
    1. Equity analysis in the development of the Plan.
    2. LEA school board approval of the Plan (e.g., public posting, provide opportunity for public comment as pre federal requirement).
    3. LEAs must post the Plan on the LEA website per the federal law, making it accessible for those with disabilities and those in the community whose language is one other than English.

 

Equity Lens

It is the moral and ethical responsibility and a top priority for the Lake Chelan School District to provide Equity, Access, and Opportunity for every student, and to eliminate inequity in our educational system. 

 

Educational equity means that each child receives what they need to develop to their full academic and social potential.

Working towards equity in schools involves:

    • Ensuring equally high outcomes for all participants in our educational system; removing the predictability of success or failures that currently correlates with any social or cultural factor;
    • Interrupting inequitable practices, examining biases, and creating inclusive multicultural school environments for adults and children; and
    • Discovering and cultivating the unique gifts, talents and interests that every human possesses. (National Equity Project)

Purpose:

The Equity Lens* lays out a clear process and a set of questions to guide the development, implementation and evaluation of significant policies, initiatives, professional development, programs, instructional practices and budget issues to address the impacts on equity due to race, gender, sexual orientation, ability, home language, housing stability and/or wealth. 

The concept of equity goes beyond formal equality — where all students are treated the same — to fostering a barrier-free environment where all students, regardless of their  race, gender, sexual orientation, ability, home language, housing stability and/or wealth, have the opportunity to achieve. This means differentiating resource allocations, within budgetary limitations, to serve students with the support and opportunities they need to succeed academically. 

 

Why and when should we use it?

    • Program Development: Use the Equity Lens to determine if proposed policies, budgetary decisions, programs, professional development and instructional practices are likely to close the opportunity gap for specific, historically marginalized groups in Lake Chelan Schools.
    • Program Review: Use the Equity Lens to determine if existing policies, budgetary decisions, programs, professional development and instructional practices are likely to close the opportunity gap for specific, historically marginalized groups in Lake Chelan Schools.
    • Daily Use: Use the tool to create a leadership lens that is applied in all settings to decrease the opportunity gap, and increase positive outcomes for students of historically marginalized groups and communities.

Process:

How should we use it?

The Equity Lens is a series of questions to help analyze the likely outcomes for and impacts on historically marginalized groups and communities.

  1. Who are the groups affected by this policy, program, practice or decision?  
  2. How have we intentionally involved stakeholders who are also members of the communities impacted by this policy, program, practice or decision?  Can the stakeholders validate our assessments and conclusions?
  3. What are the potential impacts on these groups?  Does this policy, program, practice or decision have unintended consequences, such as ignoring or worsening existing disparities?
  4. How have we collected specific information about the school, program and community conditions to help us determine if this decision will create inequities that would increase the opportunity gap? 
  5. What are the barriers to a more equitable implementation of our policy, program, practice or decision?  (Consider mandates, politics, emotions, finances, or programs.)
  6. How will we mitigate any negative impacts and address any barriers that we have identified?
  7. How will we evaluate and be accountable for making sure that the proposed solution ensures educational equity for all students, families and staff?

Post:

How should we communicate our decision?

As we work toward creating more equitable outcomes for students and families from historically marginalized groups and communities, it is important that we are highly transparent with our processes and communications.

  1. Determine the level of executive sponsorship that is necessary for the decision to be supported.  How will you gain that sponsorship?
  2. Determine the most appropriate and effective methods for communicating the decision.  Who should lead the communication?
  3. Determine the most transparent and effective way to gain continued feedback and input on the decision, especially from those groups who the decision is intended to impact.

*Adapted from the Maryland Association of Boards of Educators Equity Lens; and the National Equity Project.

Back to Top ↑

 

 

Health and Safety of Students, Staff, and Families

Maintenance of Service

Stemming from impacts of the pandemic, the Lake Chelan School District has experienced a considerable drop in student enrollment.  This has created a direct impact on the revenues that are provided to our district from the State of Washington.  It is our intent to first and foremost, retain the necessary staffing to provide high quality programming that is consistent with our current model of schooling.  This will include maintaining the necessary certificated and classified nursing, secretarial, maintenance and transportation staff in order to meet the needs of our students.

 

Facilities Upgrades and PPE

As a result of the pandemic, the district continues to incur costs related to the safe and healthy delivery of the school program. This includes expenditures related to HVAC systems, furniture requirements, adjustments to existing school and classroom spaces, as well as seeking to add additional learning spaces to address CDC requirements.  The district plans to expend funds in order to upgrade facilities to be used for additional learning spaces.  This includes improvements to the existing structure at 330 N. Bradley St.

Back to Top ↑

 

 

 

Diagnostic Assessments and Findings

The Academic and Student Well-being Planning Team conducted a deep review of the available data related to both academics and well-being.  Per OSPI guidance, the team identified specific diagnostic assessments tools by grade level, identified students most impacted, and identified student learning and well-being gaps.

Academics Well-being
Diagnostic Tools
  • iReady — Reading and Math (K-8)
  • SBAC (3-8,10)
  • Disproportionality (K-12)
  • WAKids (K) – Nov. 2021
  • Failure Rates (6-12) – Nov.  2021
  • Post-secondary Outcomes (12) – Nov.  2021
  • Transition Data (5,8,12) – Nov.  2021
  • ELPA Scores (K-12) – Nov. 2021
  • CEE Student Survey (5-12)
  • SEL Screener (K-8)
  • IPP Student Survey (3-12)
  • Attendance Rates (K-12)
  • Discipline Rates – Exclusion (K-12)
  • Universal Screener (K-12) – Nov. 2021
  • Second gate screener (K-12) – Nov. 2021
  • Co-curricular participation rates (6-12) – Nov 2021
  • AFTERS participation rates (K-8) – Nov 2021

 

Demographics Programs
Subgroups
  • Gender
  • Hispanic/Latinx
  • White
  • McKinney-Vento/Homeless
  • Students with Disabilities
  • English Language Learners
  • Mobile 
  • Low-Income
  • Migrant

 

Academics Well-being
Findings
  • Hispanic/Latinx, English Learners, Low-Income, Migrant and Students with Disabilities have the largest learning gaps at all levels of our school system in both English Language Arts and Math, averaging between 20 and 45 percentile points.
  • The learning gaps for these students are evident on all assessment tools and persist across all grade levels.
  • Students who are in multiple subgroups are the most impacted.
  • Hispanic/Latinx and English Learners are overidentified for special education services.
  • Hispanic/Latinx and English Learners are underidentified for highly capable services.
  • Data shows a considerable need for additional counseling and therapeutic mental health services for students and families.
  • Data shows a lack of belonging, sense of connection, and reflection of self/culture in the school program for roughly half of the students.
  • Data shows students’ capacity to self-regulate and preserve below the 39th percentile nationally.
  • Data shows that Hispanic/Latinx students experience long term absences from school at twice the rate of white students.
  • Data shows that Hispanic/Latinx and migrant students receive disciplinary consequences that exclude them from school at 2 times and 7 times the rate of white students respectively.

Back to Top ↑

 

 

Academic Recovery and Acceleration

Maintenance of Service

Stemming from impacts of the pandemic, the Lake Chelan School District has experienced a considerable drop in student enrollment.  This has created a direct impact on the revenues that are provided to our district from the State

of Washington.  It is our intent to first and foremost, retain the necessary staffing to provide high quality programming that is consistent with our current model of schooling.  This will include maintaining the necessary certificated and classified instructional staff in order to meet the needs of our students.

Inclusionary Practices Project

Based on the prevalent gaps for multiple subgroups of students, we recognize that we cannot intervene or remediate our way to equitable outcomes for students.  We must focus on creating a rigorous, standards-aligned core program that is accessible to and effective for all of our students.  We are committed to fundamentally shifting our systems, programs and practices to better serve all students through an Inclusionary Practices Project. The primary focus of this work will be to create learning experiences aligned with the Universal Design for Learning framework.  

 

We have created an Inclusionary Practices Project Team to lead and facilitate this work.  The team includes representation from teachers, nurses, administrators, para-educators, parents, and board members.  This team will engage in learning and planning in order to bring this work to scale across the entire school community. The project will focus on strengthening existing practices and systems that are congruent with the Universal Design for Learning framework. We recognize this to be a 5-7 year project commitment, requiring the involvement and investment of all stakeholders.

 

AFTERS Enrichment and Acceleration Programs

The district provides universal access to after school enrichment programs at the elementary and middle school level.  The program blends opportunities for students to address skill deficits with opportunities for fun and engaging learning related to the academic standards.  The program is open to all students and transportation is provided.

 

Multi-Tiered Systems of Support

In addition to fundamentally shifting our core practices, we recognize that some students will continue to need additional academic support. A Multi-Tiered System of Support (MTSS) is a data-driven, problem-solving framework to improve outcomes for all students. MTSS relies on a continuum of evidence-based practices matched to student needs.  School administrators are conducting an audit of the MTSS using the “MTSS Self-assessment” from the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and the Novak Educational Consulting.

 

Elementary Level:

Tier Two Support Student Identification Tool Targeted Student Groups
Leveled Literacy Intervention small groups iReady diagnostic/RAN/RAS EL, Migrant, Low-income
iReady toolbox iReady diagnostic 3x/year EL, Migrant, Low-income
Family visits outside of the school day Absence rate at school Hispanic/Latinx, Migrant
G.O.A.T. Room (Sensory Room) access for SEL or behavior  Behavior referrals Individualized based on data
English Learner Services ELPA/WIDA Scores EL

 

Tier Three Support Student Identification Tool Targeted Student Groups
Push-in services from special education endorsed staff i-Ready diagnostic data Students with Disabilities
Services from EL endorsed support staff ELPA/WIDA  EL newcomers or Level 1 students
1:1 Counseling or small group sessions Parent or teacher referral, SEL student surveys Individualized based on data
Attendance contract or plan with families, visits from SRO to family home Absence rate – if approaching 5-7 unexcused absences from school Individualized based on data

 

Middle Level:

Tier Three Support Student Identification Tool Targeted Student Groups
ELA Academy i-Ready and SBAC EL, Migrant, Low-income
Math Academy i-Ready and SBAC EL, Migrant, Low-income
English Learner Services ELPA/WIDA Scores EL
Para push in IEP, EL level, grades EL, Migrant, Low-income

 

Tier Three Support Student Identification Tool Targeted Student Groups
Push-in services from special education endorsed staff i-Ready diagnostic data Students with Disabilities
Read 180 i-Ready, SBAC, HMH LAP
Math 180 i-Ready, SBAC, HMH LAP
Attendance contract meeting Truancy Individualized based on data

 

Secondary Level:

Chelan High School-

Tier Two Support Student Identification Tool Targeted Student Groups
Para push in IEP, EL level, grades EL, Migrant, Low-income
Game plan class Behavior, Attendance, Grades EL, Migrant, Low-income
EL support class ELPA/WIDA Score, grades EL
Co-teacher in room IEP, EL level, grades EL, Students with Disabilities
Small group SEL Behavior, Attendance, Grades, SEL surveys Individualized based on data

 

Tier Three Support Student Identification Tool Targeted Student Groups
HSS Class for 9th grades 8th grade Fs/SEL barriers Hispanic/Latinx, EL, Migrant, Low-income
Para push in IEP, EL level, grades Hispanic/Latinx, EL, Migrant, Low-income
Lab class w/ online curric. Grades Hispanic/Latinx, EL, Migrant, Low-income
One-on-one counseling Behavior, Attendance, Grades Individualized based on data
PLUS time Behavior, Attendance, Grades Individualized based on data
Attendance contract meeting Truancy Individualized based on data
Work based learning Case-by-case, Career Pathway Individualized based on data

 

Chelan School of Innovation-

Tier Two Support Student Identification Tool Targeted Student Groups
ELA Academy i-Ready and SBAC Hispanic/Latinx, EL, Migrant, Low-income
Math Academy i-Ready and SBAC Hispanic/Latinx, EL, Migrant, Low-income
ReadTheory ReadTheory diagnostic Hispanic/Latinx, EL, Migrant, Low-income
IXL IXL diagnostic Hispanic/Latinx, EL, Migrant, Low-income

 

Tier Three Support Student Identification Tool Targeted Student Groups
Read 180 i-Ready, SBAC, HMH LAP
Math 180 i-Ready, SBAC, HMH LAP

 

Summer Programming and Credit Retrieval

The district will provide extended-school year opportunities to support targeted students across all grade levels.  The focus will be on providing services to students identified as furthest from academic proficiency and experiencing Social Emotional challenges.

 

STEAM Summer Camp: Enrichment and Acceleration (K-7)

The STEAM Summer Camp program targets kindergarten through 7th graders.  Students were referred to the program by classroom teachers based on readiness to benefit from additional exposure to ELA and Math instruction, enrichment activities, and/or increased social-emotional development opportunities.  The program balances hands-on STEAM enrichment activities facilitated by trained AFTERS instructors with academic acceleration in ELA and Math provided by certified teachers with the support of paraprofessionals.

 

LIFT Summer School (8)

The LIFT Summer School program targets 8th graders failing 2 or more core classes in the 2nd semester of their 8th grade year.  The program curriculum focuses on high school readiness, improving executive functions related to goal setting and organization, Social Emotional Learning skills, reading comprehension, math fundamentals, and STEM.  The program features frequent guest speakers who are able to speak directly to the program focal areas.  The program will run 3 hours a day for 12 total days.

 

Online Credit Recovery (9-12)

Online credit retrieval courses will be available to all students with targeted enrollment and support for students that are credit deficient, migrant students, and/or English language learners.  The courses will be facilitated by a certificated teacher.  Onsite support for successful completion will be provided on an as needed basis for identified students and/or by request of the student and family.

 

Professional Learning

Job-embedded professional learning will be provided through the addition of Inclusionary Practices Consultant Teachers.  These teacher leaders will facilitate professional development and professional collaboration in the service of building staff capacity to develop and deliver universally designed learning experiences.  In addition, the district will partner with Novak Educational Consulting to provide on-going professional learning throughout the 21-22 school year.  Additionally, professional learning opportunities will be provided specific to the implementation of Universal DEsign for learning and Multi-tiered Systems of Support.

 

In addition, we will be creating Lab Classrooms to support capacity building. Lab Classrooms are dedicated spaces that provide opportunities for teachers and other instructional staff to engage in the work of teaching together.  Lab Classrooms are designed to offer professional development that is close to practice and fosters collaborative communities in which educators continue to learn from one another and develop shared practices. The Lab Classroom is an in-house professional development model that takes place in a host teacher’s room during the normal school day. 

Back to Top ↑

 

 

 

Student Social, Emotional, and Mental Well-being

Maintenance of Service

Stemming from impacts of the pandemic, the Lake Chelan School District has experienced a considerable drop in student enrollment.  This has created a direct impact on the revenues that are provided to our district from the State of Washington.  It is our intent to first and foremost, retain the necessary staffing to provide high quality programming that is consistent with our current model of schooling.  This will include maintaining the necessary certificated and classified nursing, counseling and itinerant staff in order to meet the needs of our students.

 

Comprehensive Approach to Family and Student Services

We recognize that the pandemic has exponentially amplified the need for student and family services.  As a result, we have prioritized professional collaboration through the formation of a Family and Student Services Professional Learning Community.  The intent of this PLC is to bring together all of the education professionals that provide assistance to our students and families under the funding and guidance of separate categorical programs.  The goals are to align and improve services, eliminate duplication, and to improve identification of students and families for support. (Family and Student Services Team)

 

Staffing

We are committed to supporting families and students as we emerge from the pandemic with additional staffing resources to address our identified needs. We believe that critical additions and shifts in staffing are necessary to ensure the wellbeing of our students and families.

Social Worker. We are seeking to hire a bilingual social worker in order to increase our capacity to provide therapeutic services to students and families. Our data indicates an extreme need for these services.  This person will provide direct support to students and families across all grade levels, though with targeted needs within our Hispanic/Latinx community and within our alternative high school setting.

Latinx Community Liaison.  This will be a shift in responsibilities for the current Family and Community Liaison to be more focused on the needs of our Latinx students and families.  With the addition of the social worker, this position will focus on building relationships with community partners and linking families with community resources versus direct service to students as is currently the case. This person will serve as a cultural broker between the school district and our Latinx community.

Equity and Engagement Specialist.  We are recommending the hiring of an Equity and Engagement Specialist that serves as a liaison between families and the school district to help develop and sustain a  trusting and supportive relationship that will benefit students, families, and the district to increase student belonging and achievement. This person will also provide district‐wide support for student learning by helping students, parents,  teachers, and other school staff to give priority to educational equity and cultural relevance. This person will support the Family Visit initiative at the secondary level and support other initiatives to improve attendance among targeted student populations.

 

Identification for Services

The district will be implementing a universal social emotional screener (the BASC3-BESS) that aligns to the state SEL standards and allows us to identify ways in which we need to strengthen our tier one supports.  In addition, we will be administering a second gate screener (SSIS-SEL) which will help us identify students who need a more robust and targeted tier two intervention.  The second gate screener comes with additional curriculum that aligns to the student’s results and provides individualized support that our counselors will implement in groups or 1:1.   

 

Multi-Tiered Systems of Support

In addition to fundamentally shifting our core practices, we recognize that students need to feel safe and welcome in their schools in order to be able to focus on learning, we will develop and implement a multi-tiered system of support inclusive of tiered behavioral support, and social and emotional learning (SEL).  Please see the MTSS tables in the Academic Recovery and Acceleration section above for specific strategies.

Attendance Initiative (K-5)

We are expanding upon our Check and Connect program at the elementary level that has been piloted this year. With support from an OSPI attendance grant, we will be incorporating the use of the GOAT room, a multi-sensory space that supports students with brief breaks to reset during the school day.  In addition we will be implementing Family Visits with incoming kindergarten families, as well as with families from targeted subgroups based on the data — Hispanic/Latinx and migrant. The intent of Family Visits is to better understand the lived experience of our traditionally marginalized families and students in order to identify strengths and experiences that can inform our school and learning design. 

Belonging Initiative (K-12)

As a school district, we will be implementing an initiative to increase belonging and connectedness for students and families district-wide.  The initiative will be based on the Dignity Framework from the book Belonging Through a Culture of Dignity: The Keys to Successful Equity Implementation by Floyd Cobb and John Krownapple.  We will be conducting a district-wide book study and including professional development at the start of the school year and throughout the school year.  In addition, at the secondary level we are recommending the hiring of an Equity and Engagement Specialist to coordinate attendance, engagement, and family visits.  This work couples with our current Character Strong and Steps to Respect programs.

Suicide Prevention (6-12)

As is evidenced by neighboring districts in the valley, the pandemic has had a serious impact on students experiencing loneliness and disconnection.  Our social emotional data indicates that we have a segment of our students feeling this way.  As a result, we are partnering with Columbia Valley Community Health to implement the only7seconds suicide prevention and awareness program. Our mental health provider and BCBA will be helping to administer this program through staff professional learning and direct service to students.

 

Professional Learning

We will be working to build capacity for staff to better support students and families through program and assessment specific training.  In addition, we will be working to implement the Dignity Framework (Crab and Krownapple) in order to increase belonging and audit our system and programs for exclusive practices.  We will continue to implement and provide training for staff on universal design for learning which overlaps with our tier one social emotional learning with regards to self regulation and executive functioning.

 

This fall, our counselors are planning to train our staff in QPR (question, persuade, refer) suicide prevention.  The QPR mission is to reduce suicidal behaviors and save lives by providing innovative, practical, and innovative suicide prevention training.  In addition, we will be training our crisis response team in Safety Care this June.  Safety-Care® Behavioral Safety Training program provides the skills and competencies necessary to effectively prevent, minimize, and manage behavioral challenges with dignity, safety, and the possibility of change.  Safety-Care provides the tools you need to be safe when working with behaviorally challenging individuals. Using up-to-date and effective technologies from Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) and Positive Behavior Interventions & Supports (PBIS), the Safety-Care program will provide your staff with strategies for preventing and managing behavioral challenges teaching replacement behaviors.  These strategies are appropriate for individuals experiencing developmental, neurologic, psychiatric, and other impairments. Safety-Care promotes a positive reinforcement-based approach and develops new skills, resulting in fewer restraints.

Back to Top ↑

 

 

Monitoring Student Progress

In the end we recognize that the success of this plan is entirely dependent on its positive impact on our students. We commit to applying the Equity Lens as part of this process, in order to ensure that our methods and programs are working for identified students and families. We commit to a regular review of the impacts of our programs and strategies based on the timeline below:

Fall Winter Spring
Apply the Equity Lens as a part of our data review process.
  • Review the WAKids data for incoming Kindergarten students for targeted areas of support.
  • Review Fall universal SEL screener data to identify students for targeted support.
  • Review prior Spring ELPA/WIDA data for English Learner progress.
  • Review iReady data for impact of summer learning programs
  • Review attendance and discipline data for impact of strategic programs on targeted student groups
  • Review Spring SBAC  impact of universal and strategic supports
  • Review iReady data for impact of universal and strategic supports
  • Review Fall SBAC  impact of universal and strategic supports
  • Review year over year universal SEL screener data to identify students for targeted support.
  • Review attendance and discipline data for impact of strategic programs on targeted student groups
  • Review iReady data for impact of universal and strategic supports
  • Review annual CEE staff, student, and parent surveys for overall plan impact
  • Review attendance and discipline data for impact of strategic programs on targeted student groups

Back to Top ↑

 

 

Student and Family Voice

The district is working to fundamentally change our approach to working with students and families.  We are working to shift from student and family involvement that focused on one-way communication from the district to families to family partnerships focused on continuous, reciprocal communication.  The goal is to deeply connect with students and families in order to engage them as co-designers of our school programs and systems of support.

 

District Revisioning

We recognize that this is an opportunity to engage our community in a broader conversation about our school programs and desired outcomes for our students.  As a result, we are embarking on a revisioning process that is being led by a cross-representative committee of staff, students, alumni, parents, and community members, ensuring representation from traditionally marginalized groups. This strategic visioning process will take place over the next year and a half, as we work to take your vision and craft a plan that will serve our District for the next decade. We will be conducting a broad community survey along with focus groups to ensure that this vision reflects the values and aspirations of the entire community.

 

Surveys and Focus Groups

We will continue to partner with the Center for Educational Effectiveness to conduct annual surveys of our students and families regarding their perspective about our school programs.  We will continue to annually review this data with our school and district leadership teams to make adjustments based on feedback. In addition to the CEE data, we rely heavily on both formal and informal focus groups to gain qualitative feedback about our school programs.  The migrant/bilingual Parent Advisory Committee serves as a critical sounding board for our students and families requiring strategic support.  We also assemble ad hoc committees related to categorical programs and large decisions that are inclusive of students, families, and broader community.

 

Family Visits

With support from OSPI through a competitive grant process related to attendance, we will be implementing formal Family Visits beginning in August 2021.  Staff will be trained via a trainer-of-trainers model in how to conduct Family Visits that are based on aspirational interviewing and funds of knowledge research.  The intent of these meetings is to better understand the lived experience of our traditionally marginalized families and students in order to identify strengths and experiences that can inform our school and learning design.  These are “listening sessions” that position the student and family at the beginning of our learning design process.  This work will initiate at the elementary school level and then broaden to the secondary level.

Back to Top ↑

 

 

Community Partnerships

Thrive Chelan Valley

Our partnership with Thrive Chelan Valley is based on a systemic approach to listening for unmet student needs and creating a plan to meet them. Our partnership is focused on serving youth who have been historically marginalized. Examples of the ways that Thrive currently helps us to meet student needs are:

  • Food2Schools program: Thrive provides weekend meals to food insecure students in both districts throughout the school year and summer
  • Cares program: School advocates provide referrals to Thrive regarding barriers to student learning and/or student health needs; Thrive provides resources to remove barriers and empower student success.
  • Mentoring program: School counselors act as conduits to help refer students for Thrive’s 1:1 mentoring program as well as provide opportunities to present to students each year about their opportunity to request a Thrive mentor.
  • Teen Center: Thrive provides a critical space for pro-social development for targeted teenage youth within our community.  The teen center provides a safe space and activities to support adolescent development outside of the school day.

 

Columbia Valley Community Health

We partner with Columbia Valley Community Health to provide critical  therapeutic mental health counseling to students and families. In addition, we acknowledge that the pandemic has illuminated the already existing mental health crisis in our valley.  We are working together with only7seconds to support students and families in building awareness around the importance of human connection.  We have offered, and will continue to offer parent evenings in partnership with only7seconds, CVCH, our mental health providers, and our BCBA to support our families with regards to substance abuse, mental health awareness, and parenting.  

 

Chelan Valley Hope

We partner with Chelan Valley Hope to help individuals and families in crisis access basic needs like emergency shelter, utilities and rent assistance, food and transportation vouchers, food, clothing, and other social and health services.  In addition, Chelan Valley Hope provides enrichment programs, family advocacy programs, mental health services, and educational opportunities.

 

Chelan Valley Housing Trust

The Chelan Valley Housing trust is a non-profit organization in our community that recognizes that affordable housing is a critical issue in our community.  We partner with the Chelan Valley Housing Trust to support families in our district from targeted populations who are struggling to find or keep affordable housing.

 

Booster Club

The Booster Club supports access to co-curricular programs through scholarships for fees, access to necessary equipment to participate, and other costs associated with participation.  The Booster Club helps us to engage targeted groups in pro-social, co-curricular activities.

 

The Community Foundation of NCW

The Community Foundation is a critical partner in supporting identified youth in our community.  As a regional partner, the foundation helps us to bring resources to families that are in need.  These can be direct support to students and families as well as funding for programs related to health, wellbeing and academic development.

 

Lake Chelan Rotary

The Lake Chelan Rotary is a long standing partner to the Lake Chelan School District.  The Rotary and its members support critical programs for students within the school community.  The Rotary provides funds to support district-led initiatives as well as supporting local and national Rotary programs that seek to serve and support community youth.


OSPI Academic and Student Well-Being Recovery Plan: Planning Guide 2021

 

Back to Top ↑

Font Resize
Contrast